October 24th, 2014

In The News: Baidu’s Smart Bike Revealed, Apple to Add More Stores in China, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg Addresses Beijing Crowd in Mandarin

China’s tech industry has some exciting news to share this week. Apple has said it plans to open 25 more stores in China and CEO Tim Cook said it’s investing “like crazy” in the market. Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg also appears determined to crack the Chinese market by visiting Beijing and wowing an audience with his Mandarin. Other news includes Xiaomi’s migration of international users’ data to overseas and the unveiling of Baidu’s smart bike called the DuBike.

October 23rd, 2014

Shunee Yee Visits White House, Supports Women in Business

It’s not often that people get an invitation to attend a meeting at the White House. So when our founder and CEO Shunee Yee received an invitation to the White House ‘Top Women in Business’ briefing, she couldn’t turn it down.

October 22nd, 2014

Churlish – Wacky Word Wednesday

Someone who cuts in front of you on the line to the movies is undoubtedly rude, but that rare individual who looks you right in the eye, steps into line ahead of you, and smirks is something else entirely; a level way beyond rude. And though such people can really ruin your day, it’s important to remember that they probably weren’t always that way; people are a product of their environment after all. That’s also true for today’s Wacky Word Wednesday, a word that means so much more than rude: churlish.

Churlish

[chur-lish]

-adjective

Rude in a mean-spirited and surly way.

October 21st, 2014

Mommy, What Will My Job Be in 2030?

With the impending Big Data revolution alongside incredible advances in robotics and artificial intelligence (A.I.), an estimated 47% of jobs are at risk of being automated out of existence within the next 10 years—though some experts put that figure far higher. At the same time, though, the latest wave of technological revolution is sure to create a host of new careers. In today’s T for Translation, we’ll explore the likely – and some not-quite-so-likely – job openings of the future.

October 20th, 2014

The “Corporate Goddesses” of CSOFT: San Francisco

Nicknamed the “corporate goddesses,” the 12-foot-tall statues have loomed over San Francisco’s Financial District for decades inspiring wonder, admiration and, yes, even a little fear.

October 17th, 2014

In The News: The World of Aviation at Your fingertips, Alaska Airlines Experiments with Fingerprint Scanners, China’s Love for Luxury Grows

The number of airline passengers each year is expected to more than double by 2034. In this week’s news segment, we look into the future of the airline industry through a recent report by the International Air Transport Association. You’ll also read about China’s growing interest in luxury hotels and a new technology that could replace traditional boarding passes with a passenger’s fingerprints.

October 16th, 2014

The Languageless User Interface

Today, with the power of the Internet, Google Play, the Apple Store, or any of the smaller virtual application markets, digital entrepreneurs have access to billions of consumers and the potential to earn billions of dollars. Unfortunately, if the majority of consumers can’t understand an app, they can’t use it. Linguistic differences stand in the way of potential blockbuster sales. But that doesn’t necessarily mean translation is needed; there are ways of communicating without words. In today’s T for Translation, we’ll explore examples of clever application design that have bypassed the hurdles of a multilingual world and reaped enormous benefits by doing so.

October 15th, 2014

Frisson – Wacky Word Wednesday

Strapped into a rollercoaster with a white-knuckled grip on the padded bar that you hope is holding you down, you hear the clack-clack-clack of the chain that is lifting your cart up what seems to be an impossibly tall hill and you feel…what exactly is that feeling? Is it excitement? Is it fear? Is it a convolution of the two? Today’s Wacky Word describes the feeling that we hate to love—frisson.

Frisson

[free-sohn]

-noun

A sudden strong feeling of excitement or fear; a thrill; an almost pleasurable sensation of fright.

October 13th, 2014

Shunee Yee on Starting a Business from Scratch

Having met some of the most powerful female entrepreneurs on the planet last week, CSOFT CEO Shunee Yee is now back in Beijing, more inspired than ever—although a little jet lagged. You might recall our announcement last week on T for Translation about the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit (MPW), held in Laguna Niguel, CA. The MPW Summit started 16 years ago and is now an annual event for the world’s top businesswomen. Ms. Yee did an inspiring job speaking on a panel called “Scaling Your Company,” in which she illustrated the challenges and rewards of starting a business from scratch. She said the biggest risk she has taken was choosing China as her headquarters more than 10 years ago, a bet that has paid off. When asked about her biggest challenge, she said, “The toughest thing is really to define a focus; the easiest part is to get distracted.”

October 13th, 2014

The White Whale of Entrepreneurship

In literature we can find the greatest of heroes and vilest of villains—some that serve as cautionary tales and some as motivation—but rare is the character that provides both inspiration and forewarning. One such persona can be found in the figure of Captain Ahab from Herman Melville’s classic, Moby Dick.

Captain Ahab is a man of unshakable purpose and absolute blindness to the possibility of failure—similar to many of modern time’s most successful entrepreneurs. Before setting out on his riskiest venture, the capture of the white whale, Moby Dick, he’s already proven himself to be among the most able whale boat captains in Nantucket. But on his previous voyage, his nemesis severed his leg. Similarly, very few famous leaders jump into their own business without first achieving positive results in another—and often after suffering the odd failure, too. Also like most great leaders and entrepreneurs, Ahab is well ahead of his time. Though early 19th-century America was a mess of intolerance and racism, he hired all races, religions, and creeds to form his multicultural crew. It’s here with this unconventional team that Ahab’s leadership is most apparent; at first his single-minded drive unnerves the sailors, but soon they find themselves swept up in his mission, propelled forward by the Captain’s insatiable ambition.