TheNewStarbucksLogo OneStepClosertoHardcoreGlobality

The New Starbucks Logo – One Step Closer to Hardcore Globality

Have you heard the news about Starbucks’ new logo? Apparently, there’s a big fuss online because they removed the company’s name and the word “coffee” from the logo, leaving only the iconic representative of their products, the green siren. Fans of Starbucks seemed to be fairly against the change, but it’s possible that the removal of the words from the logo is an important part of Starbucks’ globalization strategy. If you’re interested in international branding, business, or language, you should stop on by and let us know what YOU think about this wordless logo that’s left so many consumers speechless.

Achieving Competitive Business Advantage in the European Market

Petra Held – Achieving Competitive Business Advantage in the European Market

Successful sales strategies in Europe aren’t so simple as offering a good product at a good price. In order to effectively network and sell your products or services in the European market, you need to have an intimate understanding of culture, language, and history in your target market(s). Stop on by and see what Petra Held, a localization expert and business development manager at CSOFT, has to say about the relationship between culture, language, and different sales approaches in Europe.

WomeninLocalization PowerfulMoversandShakersintheIndustryGoGlobal

Women in Localization – Powerful Movers and Shakers in the Industry Go Global

Have you ever heard of Women in Localization? It’s a group that started in Northern California just a few years back, and recently their membership has practically exploded in numbers as the group opened their doors for global membership. Come check out this exclusive interview with the three brilliant founders who discuss the history of their group, the challenges women face in this industry, and how Women in Localization is rapidly growing into powerful, international team of movers and shakers.

YourOwnTerms FourConversationsThatTranslatorsLove(NOT!)

Your Own Terms – Four Conversations That Translators Love (NOT!)

Hey there, and happy Friday! Be sure to stop by and check out the tenth issue of “Your Own Terms,” the biweekly comic about Sir Terminus: Crusader of Logic, Manly Valor, and Multilingual Terminology Management. In this week’s issue, we actually ditch Terminus to talk a little bit about the trials and tribulations of translators, the lifeblood of our industry, whom localization vendors don’t always respect QUITE as much as they should. Hope you enjoy!

TuesdayTips ThreeQuickLocalizationPointersfromDonnaHuang

Tuesday Tips – Three Quick Localization Pointers from Donna Huang

Hey hey! Happy Tuesday morning. If you’ve got a few minutes, stop on by to check out some quick localization tips from one of CSOFT’s very own senior project managers, Donna Huang. If you’re a translation buyer or document manager, these tips are for you. And if you’ve got any pointers of your own, feel free to share them with the rest of our readers!

DITAEurope:NiceWeather,Technology,andMozart

DITA Europe 2010: Nice Weather, Technology and Mozart

For those of you who didn’t have the opportunity to attend, the DITA Europe 2010 Conference in Vienna was a rousing success. In this guest entry, Carl Yao, the Vice President of Global Strategy at CSOFT, relates two DITA success stories from companies that saved a ton of money on translation and localization as a direct result of applying XML-based DITA standards to their content development processes. Carl also gives a quick rundown of his own presentation at the conference, “How to Become an Expert Terminologist in 30 Minutes.” Come check it out!

YourOwnTerms ComingtoTermswithFull bodyScanners

Your Own Terms – Coming to Terms with Full-body Scanners

Hey there, and happy Friday! Be sure to stop by and check out the ninth issue of “Your Own Terms,” the biweekly comic about Sir Terminus: Crusader of Logic, Manly Valor, and Multilingual Terminology Management. In this week’s issue, Terminus tackles some inconsistency issues between the engineering and marketing teams, and that creepy glove-guy from Regulatory Affairs.